The Glory of the Heavens

“The heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of his hands.”  (Psalms 19:1, NIV)

Slide 86 of 86: This Hubble Space Telescope image of a sparkling jewel box full of stars captures the heart of our Milky Way galaxy. The image is a composite of exposures taken in near-infrared and visible light with Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3. The observations are part of two Hubble surveys: the Galactic Bulge Treasury Program and the Sagittarius Window Eclipsing Extrasolar Planet Search.

Slide 85 of 86: Gullies on Martian sand dunes, like these in Matara Crater, have been very active, with many flows in the last ten years. The flows typically occur when seasonal frost is present. In this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter we see frost in and around two gullies, which have both been active before. (View this observation to see what these gullies looked like in 2010.) There are no fresh flows so far this year, but HiRISE will keep watching. The map is projected here at a scale of 50 centimeters (19.7 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 50.3 centimeters (19.8 inches) per pixel (with 2 x 2 binning); objects on the order of 151 centimeters (59.4 inches) across are resolved.] North is up. The University of Arizona, Tucson, operates HiRISE, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colorado. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

Slide 84 of 86: Peering deep into the early universe, this picturesque parallel field observation from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope reveals thousands of colorful galaxies swimming in the inky blackness of space. A few foreground stars from our own galaxy, the Milky Way, are also visible.  In October 2013 Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) began observing this portion of sky as part of the Frontier Fields program. This spectacular skyscape was captured during the study of the giant galaxy cluster Abell 2744, otherwise known as Pandora’s Box. While one of Hubble’s cameras concentrated on Abell 2744, the other camera viewed this adjacent patch of sky near to the cluster.  Containing countless galaxies of various ages, shapes and sizes, this parallel field observation is nearly as deep as the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field. In addition to showcasing the stunning beauty of the deep universe in incredible detail, this parallel field — when compared to other deep fields — will help astronomers understand how similar the universe looks in different directions.  Image credit: NASA, ESA and the HST Frontier Fields team (STScI), Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt Text credit: European Space Agency

Slide 83 of 86: The image above only begins to describe Hubble's ability to amaze with both beauty and science. A massive black hole hidden at the center of nearby galaxy, Centaurus A, feeds on a smaller galaxy in a spectacular collision.

Slide 82 of 86: IN SPACE - JULY/AUGUST 2009: In this composite image provided by NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team, Stephan's Quintet (HCG 92) in the Pegasus constellation is pictured in Space. Today, September 9, 2009, NASA released the first images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope since its repair in the spring. (Photo by NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team via Getty Images)

Slide 81 of 86: IN SPACE - UNDATED: In this image provided by NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team, a stellar jet in the Carina Nebula is pictured in Space. Today, September 9, 2009, NASA released the first images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope since its repair in the spring. (Photo by NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team via Getty Images)

Slide 80 of 86: The constellations of (left to right) Ara, Telescopium, Corona Australis and Sagittarius, with the tail of Scorpius on the bottom left, circa 1990. (Photo by Space Frontiers/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

The constellations of (L-R) Ara, Telescopium, Corona Australis and Sagittarius, with the tail of Scorpius on the bottom left, circa 1990.

Slide 79 of 86: UNDATED PHOTO: This festively colorful nebula, called NGC 604, is one of the largest known seething cauldrons of star birth in a nearby galaxy. This star-birth region contains more than 200 brilliant blue stars within a cloud of glowing gases some 1,300 light-years across, nearly 100 times the size of the Orion Nebula. (Photo by NASA via Getty Images)

Slide 67 of 86: File Photo: The Crew Of Apollo 17 Took This Photograph Of Earth In December 1972 While The Spacecraft Was Traveling Between The Earth And The Moon. The Orange-Red Deserts Of Africa And Saudi Arabia Stand In Stark Contrast To The Deep Blue Of The Oceans And The White Of Both Clouds And Snow-Covered Antarctica. (Photo By Nasa/Getty Images)
Slide 64 of 86: American astronaut Bruce McCandless II photographed from the Space Shuttle Challenger during the first untethered EVA, made possible by his nitrogen jet propelled backpack (Manned Manuevering Unit or MMU), 7th February 1984. (Photo by NASA/Space Frontiers/Getty Images)
Slide 62 of 86: Neptune's largest moon Triton, is seen in this mosaic of images captured by Voyager 2 during the only visit thus far to the Neptune system.  Triton is one of only three objects in the Solar System known to have a nitrogen-dominated atmosphere (the others are Earth and Saturn's giant moon, Titan). It has the coldest surface known anywhere in the Solar System (38 K, about -391 degrees Fahrenheit) - so cold that most of Triton's nitrogen is condensed as frost, making it the only satellite in the Solar System known to have a surface made mainly of nitrogen ice.  The dark streaks overlying the pinkish ices at bottom are believed to be dust deposited from huge geyser-like plumes, some of which were found to be active during the Voyager 2 flyby. The bluish-green band visible in this image extends all the way around Triton near the equator; it may consist of relatively fresh nitrogen frost deposits. The greenish areas includes what is called the cantaloupe terrain, whose origin is unknown, and a set of "cryovolcanic" landscapes apparently produced by icy-cold liquids (now frozen) erupted from Triton's interior.
Slide 60 of 86: 1st April 1995: An image taken via Hubble telescope entitled Pillars of Creation, depicting gaseous pillars in M16, the Eagle Nebula. These columns of hydrogen and dust act as incubators for new stars. (Photo by Space Frontiers/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Slide 58 of 86: Sunrise over the West Indies, as seen from the space shuttle Discovery during NASA's STS-70 mission, July 1995. (Photo by Space Frontiers/Getty Images)
Slide 57 of 86: 7th December 1995: The released Galileo probe enters the turbulent upper atmosphere of Jupiter with its heat shield below and a parachute above. It is expected to relay around 75 minutes of information to earth, before it succumbs to the surrounding temperature and pressure. Behind it is the Galileo Orbiter, which remains above the cloud level to observe the Jupiter system from above. (Photo by MPI/Getty Images)
The Galileo probe enters the turbulent upper atmosphere of Jupiter with its heat shield below and a parachute above on Dec. 7, 1995. It was expected to relay around 75 minutes of information to earth, before succumbing to the surrounding temperature and pressure. Behind it is the Galileo Orbiter, which was to remain above the cloud level to observe the Jupiter system from above.
Slide 56 of 86: The majestic spiral galaxy NGC 4414 as photographed by the Hubble Space Telescope. (Photo by NASA)
Slide 41 of 86: IN SPACE - JULY 27: In this image provided by NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team, a planetary nebula named NGC 6302, also known as, Butterfly Nebula and Bug Nebula, in the Scorpius constellation is pictured July 27, 2009 in Space. Today, September 9, 2009, NASA released the first images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope since its repair in the spring. (Photo by NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team via Getty Images)
Slide 37 of 86: IN SPACE - NOVEMBER 27, 2012: In this handout image released on April 30, 2013 by NASA, the spinning vortex of Saturn's north polar storm is seen from NASA's Cassini spacecraft on November 27, 2012 in the Saturnian system of space. The false-color image of the storm resembles a red rose surrounded by green foliage which was made by using a combination of spectral filters sensitive to wavelengths of near-infrared light at a distance of approximately 261,000 miles from Saturn. (Photo by NASA via Getty Images)
Slide 35 of 86: 50 Years of the European Southern Observatory
A deep look at the strange galaxy Centaurus A
May 2012
Slide 34 of 86: The ring-like swirls of dust filling the Andromeda galaxy stand out colorfully in this new image from the Herschel Space Observatory, a European Space Agency mission with important NASA participation. The glow seen here comes from the longer-wavelength, or far, end of the infrared spectrum, giving astronomers the chance to identify the very coldest dust in our galactic neighbor
Slide 29 of 86: HALE CRATER, MARS - UNSPECIFIED DATE: In this handout provided by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, dark, narrow streaks on the slopes of Hale Crater are inferred to be formed by seasonal flow of water on surface of present-day Mars. These dark features on the slopes are called 'recurring slope lineae' or RSL. Scientists reported on September 28, 2015 using observations with the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer on the same orbiter detected hydrated salts on these slopes at Hale Crater, corroborating the hypothesis that the streaks are formed by briny liquid water. (Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona via Getty Images)
Slide 2 of 86: The first image ever produced of a black hole, taken by the Event Horizon Telescope on April 10, 2019 as observed at the center of Messier 87 in the Virgo galaxy cluster. The telescope was designed specifically to capture images of black holes, through a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes around the world.
I think we can agree that the verse quoted at the start is true!  (Unless you’re a Flat Earther, and deny the glory of the heavens.)

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